After Homicide: Practical and Political Responses to Bereavement

After Homicide: Practical and Political Responses to Bereavement

After Homicide: Practical and Political Responses to Bereavement

After Homicide: Practical and Political Responses to Bereavement

Synopsis

After Homicide describes the collective responses of bereaved people to the aftermath of violent death, a subject not dealt with in any detail in the literature that is currently available. The book concentrates particularly on the birth, development and organization of the self help and campaigning groups that emerged in the last decade. The author examines these as attempts to give institutional expression to interpretations of grief, and shows us that these attemps, in their turn, are implicated in a potent phenomenology of mourning. In addition, the author had special access to a number of groups and uses the infomation that he gathered through this access to discuss the practical and political importance of the work of these groups, and their affects on policing, the media and the law.

Excerpt

TheClarendon Studies in Criminology series was inaugurated in 1994 under the auspices of centres of criminology at the Universities ofCambridge and Oxford and the London School of Economics. There was a view that criminology in Britain and elsewhere was flowing with interesting work and that there was scope for a new dedicated series of scholarly books. In particular, there was a recognition that authors of research monographs, the life-blood of any subject, face growing difficulties in publishing their work. The intention, declared Roger Hood, its first general editor, was 'to provide a forum for outstanding work in all aspects of criminology, criminal justice, penology, and the wider field of deviant behaviour.' We trust that that intention has been fulfilled. Some twenty titles have already been published, covering policing; prisons and prison administration; gender and crime; the media reporting of crime news, and much else; and others will follow.

Among the most momentous changes in this field over the past two decades have been the rise of victim consciousness and of consciousness of victimisation. Paul Rock is at the very forefront of the analysis and documentation of these developments. He has already to his credit a trilogy of important studies on the subject of policy and practice regarding victims of crime -A View From The Shadows(1986), on the making of victim support policy in Canada; Helping Victims of Crime(1990) on the rise of the victim support movement in Britain; andThe Social World of an English Crown Court (1993) on the changing shape of court procedures regarding victims. It should be stressed that these studies, particularly the first, achieve an insight into actual processes of law and policy-making all too rare in the field of social policy and administration, let alone criminology and criminal justice studies.

His long involvement in the practical and organisational contexts of victim support prepared him uniquely well for the challenge of the research and writing of After Homicide. The 'secondary victims' of homicide are an exceptionally traumatised group of people who . . .

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