Physical Geography of Asiatic Russia

Physical Geography of Asiatic Russia

Physical Geography of Asiatic Russia

Physical Geography of Asiatic Russia

Excerpt

Because this book on the physical geography of Siberia and Central Asia was intended for senior geography students in the state universities and teacher- training schools of the USSR, the manner in which the facts are presented has been determined by the systematic method of teaching geography in the Soviet schools.

Each geographic region is considered to be a basic unit and is studied in terms of its historical development and its place in the present-day landscape. Only enough Tertiary geologic history is given to provide a background for a detailed study of a region's development in the Quarternary Period. In other words, historical geology is discussed only where it has influenced the historical development of the contemporary landscape. Each region is examined as an integral part of a larger area (e.g., of Western Siberia, Eastern Siberia, or the Far East), and at the same time is treated as a single entity composed of coordinated parts-zones, subzones, districts, and landscapes.

The boundaries of major and minor geographic regions are carefully drawn. Since landscapes are considered to be a result of later developments in the life of a geographic region they are discussed after the description of each region or zone. All geographic divisions are examined genetically and are described geologically and geographically, with emphasis on their modern structure, seasonal changes, and reconstruction in relation to the economy. Animals and plants are considered, whenever possible, according to their biocoenoses. Attention is given to ecological factors, seasonal change of vegetation, and the yearly cycle of animal life.

Independent geologic, geomorphologic, climatic, geobotanic, or other explications are not provided; rather, factual data from related sciences are regarded as indissoluble components of the geographic whole. The order of presentation of the material in each chapter is not always the same, and the size of the parts, chapters, and sections varies since individual elements play different roles in different regions. For example, Chapter 4 is concerned entirely with the physical geography of Eastern Siberia, but Chapter 10 covers all the aspects of a smaller geographic area.

S. P. Suslov . . .

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