Supervision and Its Vicissitudes

Supervision and Its Vicissitudes

Supervision and Its Vicissitudes

Supervision and Its Vicissitudes

Excerpt

Supervision of psychoanalytic therapy is increasingly recognized as requiring skills and knowledge somewhat distinct from that of being a competent psychotherapist. The literature on the theory and practice of supervision has expanded very considerably in recent decades, and in a few countries it is a requirement that supervisors have undergone specific trainings with proof of competence, in addition to trainings as psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists.

It may be of interest to seek valid explanations for the increasing maturity of the subject. Readers of this monograph will probably come to the conclusion that it is the growth both in sophisticated understanding of the different forms of countertransference and projective identification and of theories of "emotional learning" that has contributed most to the development of theory, practice, and training in supervision. Much of the supervision of work with more disturbed patients is likely to be beneficial if it focuses on unravelling projective and introjective identifications and the contribution that these forms of communication and defences of patients are making to the countertransferences of the staff.

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