American Diplomacy during the World War

American Diplomacy during the World War

American Diplomacy during the World War

American Diplomacy during the World War

Excerpt

The chapters which follow are not intended to constitute a comprehensive diplomatic history of the United States from 1914 to 1918. Originally composed to form a course of lectures, they are restricted to a study of the development of American policy as related to the European belligerents. Since that development was determined in all its large aspects by President Wilson, the scope of the book is even more closely restricted. It is essentially a study of the process by which Wilson, at first determined that the United States could and must stand apart from embattled Europe, was forced by the intolerable conditions of neutrality to bring America into the war and to promote a plan of international organization for peace.

I am under especial obligation to those participants in the diplomatic drama who, two decades later, have been willing to read my manuscript and to make critical comments upon the statements and conclusions contained therein: Count Bernstorff, Commander Carter, Colonel House, the Marquess of Lothian, Colonel Arthur Murray, and Sir William Wiseman. Their comments, as well as those of the anonymous German Navy archivist, are printed in the form of footnotes, with the understanding that in each case they express personal and entirely unofficial opinions. They represent varying shades of belief, not always favorable to my own conclusions. Coming from those who are entitled to speak from their own diplomatic experience their historical value is obvious.

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