The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge - Vol. 3

The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge - Vol. 3

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The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge - Vol. 3

The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

Excerpt

CHAMIER, sh? + ¯?myê´, DANIEL: French preacher (Reformed); b. at the castle of Le Mont, near Mocas (in the district of Saint-Marcellin, 23 m. w. of Grenoble), 1565; killed at Montauban Oct. 17, 1621. He belonged to an old Roman Catholic family of Avignon, but his father had embraced the Protestant faith and gained many converts in the south of France, especially at Montélimar, where he became pastor. Daniel studied at the University of Orange and at Geneva under Beza and De la Faye ( 1583-89). He was ordained minister at Montpellier, and about 1595 succeeded his father at Montélimar. His intelligence and the firmness of his character led the provincial synod to appoint him deputy to the national synod at Saumur and the political gathering at Loudun in 1596, and thenceforth he was a frequent delegate to such assemblies. He succeeded in preventing the addition of certain limitations to the Edict of Nantes, and brought the Edict to the Synod of Montpellier in 1598. In 1601 and 1602 he took part in two celebrated discussions at Montpellier with the Jesuits Cotton and Gaultier. In 1603 he presided over the National Synod at Gap, when an article was added to the Reformed confession of faith declaring the pope to be the Antichrist foretold in the Scriptures. In 1607 Henry IV. granted him permission as representative of the Church of Dauphiné to establish an academy at Montpellier, and he became professor, returning, however, after a short time to Montélimar. In 1612 he became pastor and professor at Montauban. When Louis XIII. besieged the city in 1621 Chamier sent his students to the walls, shared himself in all the dangers and misfortunes of the citizens, and was mortally wounded during the defense. In theology he held fast to Calvin's dogma of predestination, even to supralapsarianism; in some other respects he differed from Calvin, e.g., concerning Christ's descent into hell and the doctrine of angels. His works were: Dispute de la vocation des ministres de l'Église réformée ( La Rochelle, 1589); Epistolæ jesuiticæ ( Geneva, 1599); La Confusion des disputes papistes ( 1600); Disputatio scholastico-theologica de œcumenico pontifice ( 1601); La Honte de Babylone (Sédan, 1612); La Jésuitomanie (Montauban, 1618); Journal du voyage de M. D. Chamier à Paris et à la cour de Henri IV. en 1607 (ed. C. Read, Paris, 1858). G. BONET-MAURY.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: J. Quick, Memoir of D. Chamier, with Notices of his Descendants, London, 1852, also in Read edition of the Journal, u.s.

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