The Structure of Collective Bargaining: Problems and Perspectives

The Structure of Collective Bargaining: Problems and Perspectives

The Structure of Collective Bargaining: Problems and Perspectives

The Structure of Collective Bargaining: Problems and Perspectives

Excerpt

In the past three decades collective bargaining has become an important part of the system of making economic decisions in the United States. Critical decisions concerning utilization of resources and distribution of the proceeds from production have come within the scope of the bargaining process. Today, few business managers-- or citizens--are insulated from the consequences of collective bargaining. As a result students of business in general and of industrial relations in particular have a continuing interest in the evolution of the American bargaining system. And because collective bargaining mirrors broad changes taking place in unions, in business, and in society at large, it is apparent that insights derived from past experience must be sharpened and redefined in the light of new developments.

This volume reports the proceedings of a seminar on contemporary developments in collective bargaining sponsored by the McKinsey Foundation and held at the Graduate School of Business of the University of Chicago in May, 1960. The focus of the seminar was on trends and problems in the structure of collective bargaining; that is, the size and scope of bargaining units and the distribution within unions and managements of the power to make bargaining decisions. Selection of this topic reflected the judgment that certain significant changes in collective bargaining can be fruitfully analyzed within such a framework. The analysis of bargaining structure was further extended to a consideration of appropriate union, management, and public policies in this area.

The format of the seminar was planned to permit an intensive exchange of views by a small group of informed practitioners and . . .

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