Croce, the King and the Allies: Extracts from a Diary by Benedetto Croce, July 1943-June 1944

Croce, the King and the Allies: Extracts from a Diary by Benedetto Croce, July 1943-June 1944

Croce, the King and the Allies: Extracts from a Diary by Benedetto Croce, July 1943-June 1944

Croce, the King and the Allies: Extracts from a Diary by Benedetto Croce, July 1943-June 1944

Excerpt

In the morning, historical reading; but in the afternoon, visits from friends, Parente, both the Morellis, Zanotti Bianco, Petaccia. The Dohrns are here too. I was tired and had gone to bed at eleven o'clock when a telephone call from Signorina Elena di Serracapriola's villa brought the news that Mussolini had resigned and that the new Government had been entrusted to Badoglio by the King. Parente and the Morellis, who had gone away half an hour ago, on hearing the news also arrived, jubilant, and we talked of the event. Back to bed, but I could not close my eyes till four o'clock or later. The feeling I have is of liberation from an evil which weighed upon the heart's core; derivative evils and dangers remain, but that evil will not return.

July 26th

To-day, repercussions from yesterday's event. Many visits, people asking for news, conjectures, an occasional piece of reliable news. Went to the Lieutenant who commands the Carabineers here to get R.P. released. He had been arrested with others for having taken part in the attack on the Fascist headquarters in Sorrento. Was given a hopeful reply. During the rest of the day I was unable to do anything, being interrupted in whatever reading I embarked upon.

July 27th

Slept little to-night also, from midnight to 4 a.m. My thoughts are concentrated on the fate of Italy. Fascism seems already a thing of the past to me, a cycle that is closed, and I have no taste for the pleasures of vendetta. But Italy is still a painful problem. Have received 120 pages of a reprint of my History of the Kingdom of Naples ; have begun to re-read the Niebelungen and made a few additions to what I have written. Otherwise to-day, also, anxious waiting for news and much distress and feeling of rebellion at words spoken against Italy by English statesmen, who are perhaps . . .

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