Biological Transport

Biological Transport

Biological Transport

Biological Transport

Excerpt

What a strange field is transport! Here the investigator gathers information from kidney tubules, tumor cells, frog skins, gut sacs, and toad bladders. With such as these he observes behavior that violates the intuition of the enzymologist, morphologist, and chemist, and observes the behavior of molecules that may have proved inert in his every other test.

Biological transport is by no means a new subject, but it is one that has gained tremendously in interest from the various biological sciences in the last few years. The subject evolved from two rather discrete interests--that of permeability phenomena, extending back more than 60 years, and that of problems of secretion. The difficulties posed by the latter were found in the late 1930s to be associated with the former. With the closer approach to the interpretation of other cellular phenomena, the need to understand how substances and reactions are segregated and brought together in the cell and in the organism has become so pressing that many ingenious, indirect approaches to these questions have been discovered. Meanwhile, the search for the means to identify directly the structures producing transport has continued.

This presentation grew from a short series of lectures to an advanced biochemistry class, attended also by graduate students of pharmacology, physiology, microbiology, genetics, and other sciences. It should be interpreted more as a bibliographed syllabus for that instruction than as a review. Accordingly, the author has . . .

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