Administrative Reflections from World War II

Administrative Reflections from World War II

Administrative Reflections from World War II

Administrative Reflections from World War II

Excerpt

Within the planning units and "war colleges" of the general staffs of the world, military men are now at work assessing their blunders and their successes in World War II, and laying out broad lines of planning for the future. All military staffs have the gruesome but inescapable responsibility of planning the most effective "defense" of their peoples in the "next war," in the event of the failure of the new machinery of permanent peace, which is even now in process of development.

Similarly politicians and students of international relations are reviewing the kaleidoscopic history of the past generation to draw from this story the new lessons of international politics, primarily as a guide for the immediate future, in a world which is afflicted with so much power politics, discord and the "insecurity jitters." These two efforts, military and political, are of course related.

Students of administration turn to this same experience, the history of World War II, but for different purposes: first, to see to what extent the generally accepted theories and "principles" of administration have found verification under the strains and stresses of war management; and second . . .

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