Whistleblowing at Work: Tough Choices in Exposing Fraud, Waste, and Abuse on the Job

Whistleblowing at Work: Tough Choices in Exposing Fraud, Waste, and Abuse on the Job

Whistleblowing at Work: Tough Choices in Exposing Fraud, Waste, and Abuse on the Job

Whistleblowing at Work: Tough Choices in Exposing Fraud, Waste, and Abuse on the Job

Synopsis

Reactions to misconduct in the workplace are wide and varied. Using data from personal inteviews and surveys of employees in various work settings, this book examines the issue of whistleblowing from a number of different perspectives.

Excerpt

Most of the people described in the Introduction are whistleblowers. Except for the airline pilot who remained silent, the others are designated as "whistleblowers" because they are employees or former employees who report misconduct to persons who have the power to take action (see Miethe andRothschild 1994; Miceli andNear 1992). Although this definition is fairly general, it is important to recognize that whistleblowing has come to mean so many different things to different people that it defies an unambiguous description. Widely used synonyms such as "snitches," "squealers," "rats," "moles," "finks," "stools," "blabbermouths," "tattletales," "ethical resisters," and "people of conscience" clearly illustrate our diverse perceptions of whistleblowers in U.S. society.

Definitional Issues

The general definition of whistleblowing used here includes basic elements and implies several other factors that distinguish it from other forms of snitching. The basic ele-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.