The Transportation Corps: Operations Overseas

The Transportation Corps: Operations Overseas

The Transportation Corps: Operations Overseas

The Transportation Corps: Operations Overseas

Excerpt

This volume, which deals with the U.S. Army transportation activities in the oversea commands, is the last of the trilogy devoted to the history of the Transportation Corps in World War II. In the first volume attention was given to the nature of the transportation task, the functions and organization of the Transportation Corps, and the operating problems and relationships of the Corps. The second volume covered troop and supply movements within and from the zone of interior and Transportation Corps problems of procurement and training.

In this, the third volume, the oversea commands are discussed separately. This method of treatment was suggested by the nature of the material, by the fact that officers who directed Army transportation operations were responsible to the respective oversea commanders, and by the wide differences in transportation activities and problems in the several areas.

The Chief of Transportation in the zone of interior had no direct authority over transportation within the oversea commands. Transportation was but one phase of logistical operations utilized by theater commanders in the attainment of their tactical objectives. While the discussion in this volume will attempt to make clear the role of the Chief of Transportation in planning for and supporting oversea operations, such matters are presented more fully in the other volumes of Transportation Corps history. The present work deals primarily with the Army transportation organizations in the several oversea commands, the operations for which they were responsible, their relation to transportation matters that were not directly their responsibility, and their position in the theater structure.

In the main, the volume presents a topical treatment of the organization and major types of transportation within each oversea command, although efforts have been made in the introduction and elsewhere to orient the reader to underlying strategic and logistic developments and problems. This compartmentalization appeared to be the method best adapted to an orderly presentation of the various transportation operations. An exception is the chapter on the South and Central Pacific, where the absence of significant rail, inland waterways, and long-haul truck operations made possible a roughly chronological approach.

The volume does not deal exclusively with Transportation Corps activities. Created in July 1942 with a relatively limited scope, the Corps assumed responsibility for operations performed until then by other technical services.

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