The Role of the Economist as Official Adviser: By W. A. Jeohr and H. W. Singer. Foreword by E. A. G. Robinson. Translated from the German by Jane Degras and Stephen Frowein

The Role of the Economist as Official Adviser: By W. A. Jeohr and H. W. Singer. Foreword by E. A. G. Robinson. Translated from the German by Jane Degras and Stephen Frowein

The Role of the Economist as Official Adviser: By W. A. Jeohr and H. W. Singer. Foreword by E. A. G. Robinson. Translated from the German by Jane Degras and Stephen Frowein

The Role of the Economist as Official Adviser: By W. A. Jeohr and H. W. Singer. Foreword by E. A. G. Robinson. Translated from the German by Jane Degras and Stephen Frowein

Excerpt

The main task of economics consists in preparing the decisions which have to be taken by economic policy. Although this is more or less generally admitted, the question as to how we ought to proceed when judging practical economic problems has not been adequately dealt with. This is no doubt an important reason for many wrong judgments in the field of economic policy.

It is the task of this book to indicate the particular problems which arise when practical questions in the field of economic policy have to be answered, and to work out the means of their solution. Its aim is not only to facilitate the task of the economist, but also to inform those who are dependent on the advice of the economist what they can expect of him. In this way, the authors hope, the connexion between economics and economic policy-- still loose--will also be strengthened.

In its original form this investigation was presented to the Swiss Study Group for Economic Theory. The objections raised and the additional matter put forward by the members of the Study Group have been taken into consideration wherever possible. Fortunately, the authors were able to resist the temptation to develop this study into an exhaustive methodological treatise. They believe that it will better be able to fulfil its task in its present concise form, although many important questions are dealt with only briefly and others are not touched on at all.

But let us not conceal the fact that not all scholars are suitably endowed mentally to engage in methodological investigations such as those contained in this book. Many authors instinctively set about tackling these problems in the right way. But after studying the methodology they become conscious of the numerous pitfalls and other dangers which are waiting for them. The result is that they lose their former sure touch, and are led astray . . .

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