Areopagitica: A Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing

Areopagitica: A Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing

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Areopagitica: A Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing

Areopagitica: A Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Milton's Areopagitica, a Speech, as he calls it, for the liberty of unlicensed printing, was written in 1644, and probably published in November of that year.

In order to understand the character of this unspoken oration, and the circumstances which induced Milton to undertake its composition, it may be advisable to glance at the period of his life immediately preceding its publication. I shall then -- without attempting to treat the thing exhaustively -- add a few remarks on the title and the subject of the work, etc., such as may seem likely to prove interesting and helpful.

I. THE PERIOD OF ITS COMPOSITION.

Milton left Cambridge in 1632, and spent the next five years mostly at his father's house at Horton, in Buckinghamshire. During this period he wrote most of his best-known earlier poems. The Hymn on the Nativity and At a Solemn Music had been already written, while he was at Cambridge, and possibly also the Arcades, but . . .

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