Architect and Patron: A Survey of Professional Relations and Practice in England from the Sixteenth Century to the Present Day

Architect and Patron: A Survey of Professional Relations and Practice in England from the Sixteenth Century to the Present Day

Architect and Patron: A Survey of Professional Relations and Practice in England from the Sixteenth Century to the Present Day

Architect and Patron: A Survey of Professional Relations and Practice in England from the Sixteenth Century to the Present Day

Excerpt

An earlier form of this book was submitted in the autumn of 1953 as a dissertation for the degree of Master of Arts in the University of Durham. Since then the preoccupations of practice and teaching have intervened. At the same time a considerable amount of further information relating to my theme has been published and, in revising my manuscript and putting it into a form likely to be more palatable to the reader, I have attempted to take this work into account. Here I am particularly indebted, as indeed anyone concerned with English architecture of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries must be, to Mr. Howard Colvin's monumental Biographical Dictionary of English Architects, 1660-1840 (1954), against which I have checked many of my dates and facts, and Sir John Summerson Architecture in Britain, 1530-1830 (1953 and 1955).

I have tried to be objective, but the following pages have been written, not by an historian, but by one who by training and profession is an architect and a teacher of architecture. The book is not intended to be propagandist in any way but, despite my efforts, should any prejudice be evident, I can only ask the reader's indulgence. In putting my original manuscript into book-form, I have had in mind primarily architectural students and young architects, in the hope that by seeing something of the paths which have led to their present position (which to many may appear confused), they may more confidently hazard the direction the paths of architectural practice will take in the future. I hope too that the book may be of interest, and perhaps of use, to the student of history and, no less so, to all who wish to know something about the architect and his work. As I have tried to make clear, the architect's relation, not only to those who pay for the buildings he designs, but to society generally, is of inestimable importance.

My debts to the many scholars on whose published researches I have relied in writing this survey are too numerous to mention here, but due acknowledgement will be found, it is . . .

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