Origin and Development of Northeastern University, 1898-1960

Origin and Development of Northeastern University, 1898-1960

Origin and Development of Northeastern University, 1898-1960

Origin and Development of Northeastern University, 1898-1960

Excerpt

The purpose of this book is to report the history of Northeastern University, not in the form of a definitive factual record but as the story of an unusual institution of learning.

The time span of the history is not extensive-1896 to 1960-- yet within that period a simple program of evening education for employed young men, conducted by the Boston Young Men's Christian Association, became a large and impressive university.

The assembling of this report has been difficult for two reasons. From 1898 until the years following World War I, the builders of Northeastern were unaware that they were developing a university; as a result, they did not record and preserve the information and interpretation which now would be of great value. The immediacy of time imposes the second handicap, since in 1960 an objective view of many events and people important to the history of Northeastern is impossible to establish. No doubt another recorder in 2060 will see these elements in authentic historical perspective.

The present story of Northeastern is the result of composite efforts. Although any errors of fact or sins of judgment must be the responsibility of the writer, many other people contributed, directly or indirectly, to the content of this book.

The setting and background of the Northeastern story was drawn from the writers listed in the Bibliography. The Annual Reports of the Boston Young Men's Christian Association from 1883 onward were a vital source of information, as were numerous University reports and records.

Dr. Carl Ell authorized this project in the fall of 1958, and in the following months provided invaluable data and general assistance.

A reviewing committee made up of Dr. Ell, Dr. William White, Dean Kenneth Ryder, and Mr. George Speers read first drafts of chapters and made corrections and suggestions.

Professors Joseph Spear, Harold Melvin, and Edward Parsons were helpful in many ways but particularly by evaluating . . .

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