The American Reader, from Columbus to Today:

The American Reader, from Columbus to Today:

The American Reader, from Columbus to Today:

The American Reader, from Columbus to Today:

Excerpt

A Union officer lies behind a low stone wall near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and watches the Confederate lines approach. How can he and his comrades withstand these men in gray who come on relentlessly even though their ranks are ripped by shrapnel, canister, and finally, musket balls? Somehow he and they do, and the officer lives to write a vivid account of the charge and its repulse a few weeks later. . . .

The military aide of President Theodore Roosevelt, and alter him. of William Howard Taft, liked to write long letters to his mother and sister, describing the habits, the characteristics, the foibles of his superiors. . . .

An old cowhand whiles away the last years of his life by putting down the recollections of his sturdy youth on range and trail. . . .

The Allied Comrnander in World War II tells the story of his experience at the center of civilization's greatest convulsion. . . .

Of these narratives, and hundreds like them, this book is made.

I do not pretend that this collection, or any other like it, is history in its final, balanced form. The personal narrative, the diary entry . . .

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