How Prints Look: Photographs with a Commentary

How Prints Look: Photographs with a Commentary

How Prints Look: Photographs with a Commentary

How Prints Look: Photographs with a Commentary

Excerpt

This book is an elementary introduction to the appearances (the outward and visible signs) of prints. It is not a history, and it contains no technical recipes or instructions for print making. Most of the time spent over it should be given to looking at its pictures.

The legends under the illustrations are integral parts of the text. The names of the artists and of the prints reproduced are given in the Table of Illustrations.

The illustrations nearly all reproduce details of prints. With few exceptions they have been enlarged, some of them very considerably. This has been done because the specific qualities of line and surface produced by the various graphic processes frequently lie below the threshold of unpracticed vision. No notation has been made of the scales of magnification, which vary according to the characteristics which it was desired to illustrate.

Just as on the street it is often impossible to recognize a still figure a long way off but easy to do so the moment it begins to move, so with practice in looking it will be discovered that the lines produced by each graphic process have a characteristic gait or motion of progress that is frequently recognizable even when the lines are too small to be seen clearly or singly. On occasion, however, the diagnosis of process becomes exceedingly difficult, and no one can be expected to make no mistakes. In spite of much care that has been taken there are undoubtedly such mistakes in this book.

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