Romance and Realism in Southern Politics

Romance and Realism in Southern Politics

Romance and Realism in Southern Politics

Romance and Realism in Southern Politics

Excerpt

Somebody has said there should be some rule in the profession that requires historians, at certain stages in their careers, to deliver popular yet scholarly lectures. Such a canon would compel the researcher to halt his constant hunt for new materials and to look back at the information he has already acquired--to think about its meaning and to think how he may present this meaning to the intelligent hearer or reader whose knowledge of history is not that of the specialist. The rule will never be made and, of course, should not be made. But something akin to it exists in the various lectureships supported by some of our universities and colleges. These offer the scholar the incentive to put his thoughts and findings together in the briefest and broadest medium.

Mercer University presented me with such an opportunity by inviting me to deliver the Lamar Lectures in Southern History in November, 1960. The writing or arranging of a set of lectures is, I suppose, a unique experience for any scholar. He will alternately be satisfied and dissatisfied with what he has put down. At one time he will like . . .

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