Simone Weil

Simone Weil

Simone Weil

Simone Weil

Excerpt

On August 24th, 1943 there died in an English sanatorium a woman of thirty-four who has been variously described as a victim of spiritual delusion, a social prophet, a modern Antigone or Judith, and a new kind of saint.

The growing interest in the works of Simone Weil, the lavish praise bestowed upon them in the most unexpected quarters, the controversies that surround her, especially in her own country, and finally the attempt to make her the object of a cult, would no doubt have filled her with mild astonishment. She died at a moment when the possibility of such fame was almost as remote as it could be; at an age when she was painfully conscious of incomplete achievement; and in a bodily condition such as to render her incapable of judging the worth of what she had left. Throughout her life she combined intellectual assurance, or something very like it, with the conviction that her thought was an accident that had befallen her. 'Ideas', she remarked,1'come and settle in my mind by mistake, then, realising their mistake, they absolutely insist on coming out. I do not know where they come from nor what they are worth, but, whatever the risk, I do not think I have the right to prevent this operation.'

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.