The Supreme Court on Trial

The Supreme Court on Trial

The Supreme Court on Trial

The Supreme Court on Trial

Excerpt

Our time is a time of national self-criticism. The American people are engaged in a severe examination of their basic commitments, their way of life, the direction they appear to be going. Our contemporary literature--over the air, in newspaper editorials and columns, in books and articles--is heavy with protest, admonition, and exhortation. The American citizen as common man is exalted by writing which cites his claims to dignity and pleads for a securing of his civil rights. He is--perhaps in equal measure--deposed from a seat of honor by writing which deplores his cultural provincialism, his fear of intellectual endeavor, his espousal of conformity.

The Supreme Court is a contributor to this national selfsurvey. But it is also the object of critical examination, for the selfstudy which is under way includes a re-evaluation of our political institutions. We have created Hoover commissions to study the national administrative system; the Electoral College has been the subject of persistent scrutiny since World War II. At the moment there is a surging demand for reconstitution of our state lawmaking bodies. Perhaps the two emphases in this comprehensive reassessment are most obviously combined in the deep concern we now display for the character and quality of our public school curriculum and for the administrative structure which maintains and manages our schools . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.