North Vietnam Today: Profile of a Communist Satellite

North Vietnam Today: Profile of a Communist Satellite

North Vietnam Today: Profile of a Communist Satellite

North Vietnam Today: Profile of a Communist Satellite

Excerpt

In 111 B.C., the ancestors of the present Vietnamese, who inhabited Tonking and part of what is today southern China, were conquered by the Han and commenced a thousand years of Chinese domination. During that time, they absorbed much of China's superior civilisation, but kept alive a strong spirit of nationalism, which enabled them to drive out their foreign masters in 939 A.D. From then until the middle of the nineteenth century they preserved their national independence, with the exception of a short occupation of the country by the Ming between 1406 and 1427.

Thrusting steadily southwards, the Vietnamese extended their frontiers until they reached the Gulf of Siam. The kingdom of Champa was destroyed in the course of this advance, and Cambodia lost much of her territory, but internal dissensions split Vietnam into two separate and mutually hostile states at the beginning of the seventeenth century. It is interesting to note that the dividing line between them was close to the present division between North and South Vietnam at the 17th Parallel. Not until the beginning of the nineteenth century were the two halves reunited, and then the country entered an era of isolationism and xenophobia, rebuffing American and European attempts to open trade relations and engaging in increasing persecution of Christianity. Such policies by a weak and backward state in the nineteenth century could lead to only one result and, in 1858, France attacked and captured the port of Tourane.

French control extended progressively, Cochin China becoming a French colony in 1867, and Tonking and Annam being made French protectorates in 1884. Effective government of the country remained in French hands until 1940, the date of the Japanese occupation.

The end of the Second World War marked the beginning of an independence struggle in which France tried to regain her lost possession, while Vietnamese Nationalists and Communists fought to secure the leadership of an independent Vietnam. Hostilities were ended by the Geneva Conference of 1954, which divided the country at the 17th . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.