The Later D. H. Lawrence

The Later D. H. Lawrence

The Later D. H. Lawrence

The Later D. H. Lawrence

Excerpt

Lawrence came to Taos, New Mexico, in the late summer of 1922. He liked it more than most places, but restlessness and curiosity drove him to Mexico the following spring, back to Europe in the fall, and half a year later to Taos again. It was here during the summer of 1924 that he wrote St. Mawr together with The Princess and The Woman Who Rode Away. Of these stories he said: "They are all sad. After all, they're true to what is."

The ranch at Taos may have been his favorite place; but he was far from simple, and here where he found life most intense he also detected disappointment and death. Here his ashes are suitably interred under the phoenix in a block of cement. St. Mawr, where the ranch is raised to symbol, is no less ambivalent.

Telling of his arrival at that place of life and death, St. Mawr (1925) seems to lead up to The Plumed Serpent (1926), his great exploitation of the American landscape. But he had begun that great panorama, which he considered his most important novel, at Chapala in 1923, a year before he started St. Mawr, and finished it at Oaxaca in January 1925, half a year after he had completed his New Mexican novelette. These works, which illuminate each other, are true to the same vision.

There is foundation in actuality not only for Lawrence's symbols of ranch and lake in these two works but also for the . . .

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