Gloria Naylor's Early Novels

Gloria Naylor's Early Novels

Gloria Naylor's Early Novels

Gloria Naylor's Early Novels

Excerpt

With this last novel, Bailey's Cafe, I have done the quartet that I had dreamed about. As I look back, I wasn't keeping stock of time or anything, but this is 1991, and I finished Brewster Place in 1981, and now I have finished the quartet. This was to lay the basis or the foundation--I saw it like this little square foundation--for a career I was going to build. So I now believe that I will have the kind of career I want.

--Gloria Naylor

Near the middle of Mama Day, George Andrews is whitewashing a chicken coop for Miranda Day, while Miranda watches him and hopes that he and Cocoa (who is his wife and her grandniece) can get past the nasty fight they had the night before. She worries a little that they might "go the way of so many of these young people nowadays. Just letting things crumble apart, 'cause everybody wants to be right in a world where there ain't no right or wrong to be found" (MD, 229-30). Moreover, she sees the impulse behind this desire to be right as the desire to have one's "side" validated, to be not only listened to but also agreed with. The latter strikes Mama Day as problematic because "just like [a] chicken coop, everything got four sides: his side, her side, an outside, and an inside. All of it is the truth" (230). One of the distinctions that Gloria Naylor draws here, between there being "no right and wrong," on the one hand, while "all of it" is "the truth," on the other hand, is crucial to her fictions and is relevant to the essays in this collection.

Not only in her novels but also in the ways that she writes and talks about authorship, Naylor attends to the importance of multiple truths, of . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.