From Social Worker to Crimefighter: Women in United States Municipal Policing

From Social Worker to Crimefighter: Women in United States Municipal Policing

From Social Worker to Crimefighter: Women in United States Municipal Policing

From Social Worker to Crimefighter: Women in United States Municipal Policing

Synopsis

In the United States, women in policing evolved from matrons to policewomen to police officers. Today, the position of police chief has been achieved by women. The changing role of women in this traditionally male-dominated field is the subject of this book. It weaves together the history of the police and the history of women and highlights a century of change in law enforcement. The book also describes how the changing role of women in society affected their role in law enforcement.

Excerpt

While it is certainly true that every book is the creation of its author, few authors are able to turn ideas into a self-contained work without the advice and assistance of others. Certainly, this is so in my case. Among those whose efforts must be recognized are David Reimers and Paul Baker, friends and advisors who taught me that a historian faces quite different challenges from those of a working police officer; Susan Ware, who sharpened my portrait of policewomen within a women's history context; and Don White, who added a cultural perspective that is uncommon in writings on police. Clarice Feinman enriched comparisons with women in corrections and in the process became a friend, while Barbara Raffel Price offered not only her knowledge, but her moral support as a. friend and as a mentor. I thank them all, but take full responsibility for the final product.

Each of the editors with whom I worked at the Greenwood Publishing Group helped ease the task of creating the present work.

Thanks are also due the librarians at the New York University Elmer Holmes Bobst Library and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Lloyd George Sealy Library. It is no exaggeration that a national study of the police could not have been undertaken without the resources of John Jay's special collection, which includes untapped riches in police history. The New York Public Library, particularly "the Annex," yielded an array of early police magazines as well as publications of the International Association of Policewomen.

Among those who also aided me were colleagues in law enforcement. Many were friends at the start; many became friends in the course of this project. Special thanks to Mary Rita Ostrander (who, unfortunately, did not live to see this book in print) and Lois Lundell Higgins for early papers of--and insights into--the International Association of Women Police; Ronald C. Van Raalte for information gathered during his research for the Law Enforcement Memorial Association; Anne Findlay Patton for her . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.