Counselor Education for the Twenty-First Century

Counselor Education for the Twenty-First Century

Counselor Education for the Twenty-First Century

Counselor Education for the Twenty-First Century

Synopsis

This book examines the need for the development of an expanded theoretical foundation of counselor education which will serve to better prepare school counselors for effectively meeting student counseling needs in the 21st century. This process includes a rethinking of meanings and outcomes associated with counselor education, the counseling process, the role of the school counselor, and the political implications embedded in educational counseling. The expanded theoretical framework includes questioning the applicability and relevance-to-practice of current counselor education, a critical analysis of psychological philosophy, investigating the principles behind critical theory, feminist theory, and postmodernism, unveiling exclusionary aspects of current counseling theory and practice. Brotherton calls for a pedagogy of inclusion and fluidity in counselor education that will be capable of handling the issues surrounding diversity, multiplicity, and exclusion that are challenging American schools.

Excerpt

Counselors often are called "change agents." This label is used as a description of the impact a counselor may have on an individual or family. For there to be equality in our multifaceted society, counselors must become change agents in a wider sphere. They are the ones to bring about counselor training reform, equality of mental health services, and personal commitments to more than the multicultural counseling issues outlined here. A change in curricula or techniques is not enough as long as there fails to be a critique of the larger social order and a plan of action for transformation. The optimum goals of education and educational counseling should be liberation, creating the foundation for equality, empowerment, social justice, and a qualitatively better life for all. Counselors must have the intellectual, emotional, and spiritual ability to critically question the social impact of their practice and, further, critically question the oppressive nature of the theoretical foundation that supports their practice.

This book examines the need and developmental support of an expanded theoretical foundation of counselor education that will serve to better prepare school counselors for effectively meeting student counseling needs in the twenty- first century. This process includes a rethinking of meanings and outcomes associated with counselor education, the counseling process, the role of the school counselor, and the political implications embedded in educational counseling. The ultimate goal of this book is to offer the field of counselor education a theoretical foundation that produces a shift in the dimensionality of school counselor education and preparation.

The necessity for an expanded theoretical framework will be substantiated by: (1) questioning the applicability and relevance to practice of current counselor education; (2) critically analyzing traditional psychological philosophy; (3) investigating the principles behind critical theory, feminist theory, and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.