Motigraphics: The Analysis and Measurement of Human Motivations in Marketing

Motigraphics: The Analysis and Measurement of Human Motivations in Marketing

Motigraphics: The Analysis and Measurement of Human Motivations in Marketing

Motigraphics: The Analysis and Measurement of Human Motivations in Marketing

Synopsis

Motigraphics is the natural complement to demographics and psychographics. It is the completion of a triad. This is because motives are the most important dimension of all human behavior. For consumers, motives lead directly to decisions and decisions directly to purchasing behavior. Demographics and psychographics tell us the what, when, where, and how of consumer behavior but Motigraphics tells us why consumers do what they do. It studies motives, the most important element of consumer behavior. Not only does Dr. Maddock show how to measure motives, but also how to assess the amount of emotion involved in a brand so that brand equity may be measured. Motigraphics defines the "subliminal cue" as the basic unit of measurement, and with this unit of measurement consumer motives can now be assessed objectively. Since most consumer decisions are based upon emotion and not reason, this book will be of the utmost importance to professionals in advertising, marketing, sales, and the academic community.

Excerpt

All animals are created equal, but some animals are more equal than others.

--George Orwell, Animal Farm

A BETTER BEAR TRAP

I was a Park Ranger in Grand Teton National Park in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, the first year that the park opened as one of our nation's officially recognized national parks. One of my jobs was to keep the bears out of the campground. Since this was an impossible task, my job description was rewritten and stated that my duties were actually to get the bears out of the campground, not to keep them out. Since they usually came at night, that's when I worked. The bears' objective, of course, was to get to the bacon and other goodies that were safely sealed away in the Coleman ice chests that everyone had at that time and were quite easily opened. Bears are rather intelligent creatures and had learned where the ice chests were kept (in tents) and had discovered that it only took one swipe of a bear paw to tear open a tent. Subsequently they had learned to open the ice chest, which at that time was sealed with a tiny stainless steel hasp. Following that sequence of events, they took over the campground, moving from campsite to campsite in a kind of "movable feast."

The National Park Service has a policy of preservation, whereas the Forest Service's policy is conservation. Under a policy of pres-

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