The American Welfare System: Origins, Structure, and Effects

The American Welfare System: Origins, Structure, and Effects

The American Welfare System: Origins, Structure, and Effects

The American Welfare System: Origins, Structure, and Effects

Synopsis

This important and timely work provides a comprehensive overview and analysis of the American welfare system from an economic, legal, historical, and policy perspective. This volume reviews the historical origins of the American welfare system, the Constitutional development of welfare law and entitlements, and the economic structure and effects of welfare based on a large national data set covering the period 1979 through 1990. The book includes policy analyses and recommendations for reform. The scope of coverage and currency of this volume makes it an indispensable reference work for policymakers, students, scholars, and analysts of welfare.

Excerpt

Welfare is a constant source of contention in American politics. It has occupied the foreground of the socioeconomic landscape for so long that it is difficult to imagine how the poor survived before welfare programs existed. In times long gone, families had the option of moving out West, staking a claim, and starting a homestead. Widows went off to work in cotton mills. Children contributed to the survival of the family by working in factories. It's very interesting that none of those options exist any longer. The frontier exists only in the movies. In post-industrial America, there is less demand each year for unskilled labor. The law prohibits the employment of child labor. What else is a single unemployed mother with a child to do but draw welfare?

That, interestingly, is the very essence of welfare. As John Drew carefully chronicles, the origins of the American welfare system arise out of the middle class movement to abolish child labor. Poor people did not demand welfare. Rich people did not bestow it as an act of noblesse oblige. The middle class, in an effort to compel attendance in school, abolished the chief competitive activity which kept children out of school: employment. However, once child labor was prohibited, society was compelled to provide welfare to replace the support lost by poor families who were dependent upon the earnings of their children. Historically this country never set out to provide welfare per se. Welfare has been a distasteful means of achieving other objectives in society. That may be why there has been so much dissatisfaction with the concept of welfare in the United States.

This book is divided into two parts. Part I by John Drew explains the origins of the American welfare system. Part II begins with two chapters by myself which empirically examines the structure and effects of the American welfare system. I find that the levels of support are low considering the probability of receiving welfare, and that substantial problems . . .

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