Organization Staffing and Work Adjustment

Organization Staffing and Work Adjustment

Organization Staffing and Work Adjustment

Organization Staffing and Work Adjustment

Synopsis

This volume explores the concepts, themes, methods, and procedures of organization staffing. As Tziner notes at the outset, although organizations usually attempt to predict the likely future performance of each applicant in terms of productivity, rarely do they consider the likelihood of the applicants finding gratification in their work-related needs and aspirations--running the risk that extremely talented staff may eventually abandon the organization because of a lack of personal fulfillment. Tziner offers a functional and integrated conceptual framework that will enable organizations to maximize the probability that staffing decisions will result in optimal work adjustment and the enhancement of organizational productivity.

Excerpt

We might begin with the story of one Elliott Banfield. Elliott was your average American achiever, believing in all that America could offer, believing in his ability to contribute to America. Yes, Elliott Banfield made the American dream come true. At thirty-five he was the chief executive of Biotronics, a fast-expanding company where he earned an annual salary of $300,000. He owned an expensive townhouse in Winnetka, Illinois, and two Mercedes Benz cars.

After graduating as a top achiever from the Harvard School of Business, Banfield joined Biotronics. Predictably, he rose through the ranks to the chief executive position, rapidly leading the firm into the top echelons of high-tech medical equipment. Then, to everybody's dismay, Banfield did the unexpected: at a meeting of the board of directors he announced his resignation from the company and his intention to retire from the business world.

What makes a successful individual decide to give up a coveted, prestigious, and influential position so hard earned and with such sustained dedication? Banfield gave the following reason: "I feel acute distress because I am not experiencing the personal fulfillment I had sought at my work. I achieved money and power--but not happiness, not contentment, nor feelings of self esteem."

Unfortunately, the Banfield episode is typical of a pervasive and gloomy reality in the world of big business. Literally hundreds of organizations in the United States and elsewhere seek to fill vacant positions with applicants who have the best potential for performing the jobs that need to be done. Accordingly, the organizations attempt to predict the likely future performance of each applicant in terms of productivity. Only rarely, however, do they consider the likelihood of the applicants finding gratification in their work-related needs and . . .

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