The First Epistle of Saint Paul to the Corinthians

The First Epistle of Saint Paul to the Corinthians

The First Epistle of Saint Paul to the Corinthians

The First Epistle of Saint Paul to the Corinthians

Excerpt

The first Epistle of the Apostle Paul to the Corinthians touches on such varied and important questions, and contains in addition so many difficult passages, that it has aroused discussions which are as exciting as they are numerous. The commentator is therefore sorely tempted to set up a kind of symposium in which his predecessors could be given ample opportunity of speaking for themselves in order to expound their own ideas and argue among themselves. We have thought fit not to yield to this temptation. For it would lead to a very bulky work likely to discourage many readers-- and purchasers. With the full agreement of the publishers responsible for this series of commentaries, we have been at pains to be concise and to reduce to a minimum the space given to controversy, whether initiated by ourselves or by others. 'Everything is permissible, but not everything is expedient.'

For the same reason, we have decided to jettison a cumbersome load of references of little value, rarely checked, often imprecise and sometimes inaccurate, which many scrupulous commentators drag along like a baggage-wagon. We think it better to quote sparingly but well, that is to give quotations and references of real value, which have been previously verified.

Divergent readings will be mentioned only when they are interesting from a philological or theological point of view, and each time the most important and characteristic authorities will be quoted. Of these, we have ourselves checked all quotations from the Fathers and from the Vulgate. But so far as the other ancient versions and manuscripts are concerned, we rely on Tischendorf (Edition Octava Maior II [1872]), from which the quotations are taken, with the exception of those from the Chester Beatty Papyrus, P 46 (third century), which we have ourselves studied in facsimile in the fine Kenyon edition (Fasc. 3, Pauline Epistles, London, 1937), and which generally confirms the text of B (Vaticanus).

Quotations from the Old Testament refer, unless otherwise stated, to the Septuagint Version (ed. Rahlfs, 2 vols, Stuttgart, undated); when this version's numbering differs from that of the Massoretic text, as for example in the majority of the Psalms, the reference to the Hebrew text is given in parentheses. Similarly 3 Kings (1 Kings) . . .

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