Ancient Italy and Modern Religion: Being the Hibbert Lectures for 1932

Ancient Italy and Modern Religion: Being the Hibbert Lectures for 1932

Ancient Italy and Modern Religion: Being the Hibbert Lectures for 1932

Ancient Italy and Modern Religion: Being the Hibbert Lectures for 1932

Excerpt

In accepting the invitation with which I was honoured by the Hibbert Trustees to be their lecturer for 1932, remembering that the theme of the lectures as defined by the Will of the Founder may be "any subject bearing upon the history of Christianity ", I ventured to make one assumption. It cannot, I feel sure, be desirable that each lecturer in turn should make some new attempt to set forth in his brief course his own particular conception of the more general aspects of religious history or religious philosophy. The purpose of the foundation can be better served, in the case of one whose work has run in well-marked lines, if he tries to acquaint his hearers or readers with one or two particular sides of the study that he has been pursuing which seem to him to throw light upon the history of religious ideas. He may be well content if the facts which he describes can suggest some new points of view from which to examine our modem problems.

It follows that not a little of the subject-matter of this volume will be known, if not familiar, to a certain number of my old pupils at Cardiff and Manchester, and to the audiences at the lectures I have given in what has become almost an annual visit to the John Rylands Library. Nevertheless, all these lectures were written for a place in a course of this kind, save that the fifth was re-written from this standpoint, on the basis of an interpretation of Vergil's story of Dido which I have maintained for over thirty" years, and which I believe was . . .

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