The Nature of Religion

The Nature of Religion

The Nature of Religion

The Nature of Religion

Excerpt

This book has grown out of later reflection upon some parts of the topic of a course of lectures concerning the philosophy of religion. This course I had given through a series of years, mainly to graduate students and under-graduates. My earlier projection had been that of an historian. In the last few, freer, years, I have sought, at least, to orient myself afresh as to the progress of the sciences of nature in our generation.

The book takes its departure from the question which students instinctively raise: What knowledge of religion can we have? Others also raise the same question.

The second chapter deals with the question, What is religion? Here I have assumed that it is fair to take illustrations, mainly, from the one religion with which most of us are likely to be more familiar, namely, JudaismChristianity. That these are one religion will be suggested to anyone who will so much as open a Bible. Their antitheses and antagonisms are mainly due to the fact that, like parents and children, they have so much in common.

The third chapter deals with questions which are fundamental to all higher religions, namely, that of manifestation of God, the intuition of immortality, and intuitions concerning God himself.

The fourth chapter seeks to present parallels to religion such as may be found in the pursuit of other realities and in the effort at their realization. I take for illustration . . .

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