Japan and the United States, 1853-1921

Japan and the United States, 1853-1921

Japan and the United States, 1853-1921

Japan and the United States, 1853-1921

Excerpt

With the exception of the first and the thirteenth chapters, the present volume consists of lectures prepared for delivery at four of the leading Japanese universities in the fall of 1921. The purpose of these lectures was to present a brief survey of the relations between the United States and Japan from the beginning of their intercourse to that time. They therefore omitted many interesting events in the domestic history of Japan and in her relations with other powers, while, on the other hand, they discussed questions in which the United States was not directly concerned but which have had an influence upon the formation of public opinion in that country. The importance of public opinion in determining international relations is now well understood, and in this survey an attempt has been made to account for the prevailing views of the Japanese and American peoples toward each other at different times in the period.

When, however, the lectures were about to be delivered, the Washington Conference was assembling. The Japanese students were keenly interested in the most recent phases of Japanese-American relations rather than in their historical development. It was a stimulating, and a very hopeful, experience to address from two to eight hundred university students who could follow a speaker in an alien tongue.

The lectures were prepared at a time when the relations between Japan and the United States were, so far as public opinion was concerned, in a very uncertain state. In . . .

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