Liberia

Liberia

Liberia

Liberia

Excerpt

This book is a story of Liberia, the only republic in Africa and one of the two Negro republics in our present-day world. Haiti is the other.

During 1947 Liberia celebrated its hundredth anniversary as a republic. Appropriately and optimistically the theme of its celebration was "West Africa in a World of Peace." Its century-old motto, "The Love of Liberty Brought Us Here," remains intact.

The Republic of Liberia fronts the Atlantic from the underpart of the huge bulge of West Africa. It is in the deep tropics between latitudes four degrees and seven and a half degrees north. On the land side it is hemmed in by the British colony of Sierra Leone, French Guinea, and France's Ivory Coast Colony. Except in the dry season, from November to March or April, the climate is rainy and in view of the latitude fairly cool. The dry season is the hot season.

As the solitary republic in a continent of subject colonies, Liberia is a gateway into Africa of immense value to the democratic world and particularly to the United States.

History books usually recount how Liberia (the name is the Latin liber with ia added for euphony) originated as a "refuge" for freed slaves from the United States, and how the colonizing began in 1822 under the auspices of the American Colonization Society -- with the helping hand of President James Monroe for whom Monrovia, the remarkable Liberian capital, was named. But most of the books fail to make clear the truth that fewer than 1500 American . . .

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