The Closed Shop

The Closed Shop

The Closed Shop

The Closed Shop

Excerpt

Labor relations have been a vital problem in the past decade and more. The position of labor has fluctuated throughout its many years of struggle, and, in the implementing of its growth and security, the closed or union shop has stood to labor as a symbol of its dignity and strength, just as the open shop has represented to the employer a symbol of his own industrial power and freedom.

Labor has come to hold a strong position today. Under the protection of the New Deal and with the impetus to organize promoted by various circumstances, and finally faced by conditions arising from a major national emergency, the closed or union shop today presents many factors peculiar to the current scene, in addition to the fundamental principles that have characterized closed versus open shop controversies in former times. New attitudes are also reflected toward the future of both labor and industry, their changing relations and their adaptations to the entire national economy.

The present number of the Reference Shelf is based mainly on recent materials and endeavors to give, without bias, some of the leading and more helpful available discussions from varied points of view. Much of the background on the trade union question has been covered in earlier numbers of the Reference Shelf. The more recent of these are Federal Regulation of Labor Unions (1941) by J. V. Garland, and Trade Unions and the Anti-Trust Laws (1940) by the present compiler.

Material is presented in a form convenient for debaters, and a supplementary up-to-date bibliography is provided. A summary of some of the main arguments of current discussions is also presented.

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