Modern Psychologies and Education

Modern Psychologies and Education

Modern Psychologies and Education

Modern Psychologies and Education

Excerpt

Probably all persons who read these lines will readily agree that interest in psychology has been increasing constantly during the past two decades and also that confusion in regard to psychology has been gaining ground in spite of the efforts of its votaries to make it intelligible and consistent. Psychology has become a favorite topic of conversation among teachers, social workers, professional people of all sorts, and laymen. If one attends an educational convention anywhere in the United States, one can hear speakers striving to expound psychological principles and apply them to educational procedures. Also, if one listens to the talk in a drawing room it will be noted that guests are praising or condemning one or another school of contemporary psychology. Physicians are introducing psychological courses into the programs of medical colleges; lawyers are inquiring about psychological books to read so that they may pursue their profession in accordance with the supposed laws of human nature; parents are asking for lists of books on psychology that they may study so that they can understand their children and train them up in the way in which they should go; social workers want to learn about the latest discoveries in psychology; and so it goes. One would expect that out of all this enthusiasm for and activity in psychology there would be available by this time a large body of principles that would be universally accepted; but this expectation--or hope, perhaps--has not yet been realized.

Four or five decades ago there was well-nigh universal . . .

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