Henry Purcell: The English Musical Tradition

Henry Purcell: The English Musical Tradition

Henry Purcell: The English Musical Tradition

Henry Purcell: The English Musical Tradition

Excerpt

Until comparatively recent times, English musical history has been written almost exclusively from the angle of the great foreign schools. Preferable as this, no doubt, is to the task which French writers have so often set themselves, of relating every phase of the national music to a pure, home-bred tradition, the converse method of referring English music at every stage to the main tendencies elsewhere, whether in Italy, Germany or wherever the current seemed to be running most strongly at the moment, has its own peculiar disadvantages. For it has resulted that whenever English music has assumed a leading importance, our historians have been rather at a loss to explain its place in the general scheme of things. It would appear to the casual student of musical history that the erratic English genius has rarely been capable of doing the right thing, from the evolutionary point of view, at the right moment. Thus, judged by European standards, the famous 13th century round 'Sumer is icumen in' has seemed as premature as the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.