Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson

Excerpt

Were the business at hand to point a moral rather than to adorn a tale, our subject would be perfect for the purpose. The years of Mr. Robinson's conscientious labor have been long enough, his success has been sufficiently belated, and his final triumph has been notable enough to furnish forth a splendid sermon that would rest upon the honored text of a copy-book axiom. No whim of public taste decreed his elevation, no planned audacity won him sudden shocked attention; at no Byronic dawn did fame salute the opening of his eyelids. His has been the long, hard road; the copy-book road, so innocent of short-cuts. His only peer among American poets, if peer he has, was a cherished scandal before he was a cherished author; the barbaric yawp that raised him from obscurity is a byword to readers who have never opened "Leaves of Grass." But if the name of Edwin Arlington Robinson has ever been linked with scandal, the fact has been blotted from our records; and the voice that has raised him from obscurity is one of such moderation, such careful modulation, that only attentive ears were first aware of it; and the circle of those early readers has been widened at a pace to leisurely.

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