Robert Laird Borden: His Memoirs

Robert Laird Borden: His Memoirs

Robert Laird Borden: His Memoirs

Robert Laird Borden: His Memoirs

Excerpt

There has at times been comment on the reluctance, or at any rate on the failure, of Canadian public men to write books. Statesmen of other countries, and particularly of Great Britain, have added much to general information by compiling in the form of autobiography or historical review an account of the times and events in which they themselves played a part. Some, indeed, of the more gifted have in that way made permanent contributions to literature. In Canada, whether from lack of inclination or because of a too limited area of readers and of market, the practice has made little headway.

Sir Robert Borden has in this as in other respects set an example. His Memoirs put together during the last years of a long and exceedingly toilsome life are now offered to the public. Few there will be who will not be disposed to welcome with generous hospitality this final evidence of his insatiable industry and devotion to his fellow-countrymen.

The broad features or divisions of Robert Laird Borden's career are well known--the birth and rearing on the Grand Pré farm in Nova Scotia; the urge to learning from an extraordinary mother; the early qualification as teacher; the law studies and law practice; the House of Commons adventure; the War Premiership; the Empire statecraft; and, throughout all, that solid success with which by intense concentration he crowned every stage before the next was reached; these things are familiarly known in this and other lands. What is most worth noting is that there was lying in his path, either as boy or man, no adventitious fortune. Latent in . . .

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