Change in Latin America: The Mexican and Cuban Revolutions

Change in Latin America: The Mexican and Cuban Revolutions

Change in Latin America: The Mexican and Cuban Revolutions

Change in Latin America: The Mexican and Cuban Revolutions

Excerpt

I SINCERELY BELIEVE that the Mexican people have long known that the Mexican Revolution is dead, although they do not know, or only half understand, why this fact is concealed instead of being proclaimed. Therefore, the question arose some time ago: If it is dead, why have the death notices not been circulated? Why, more exactly, has the Mexican Revolution not been buried in the Rotunda of the Great, or perhaps in the Monument to the Mexican Revolution, where two of its heros, Francisco Madero and Venustiano Carranza, already lie?

This lack of good manners in a people who boast of being paragons of courtesy--"as polite as a Mexican Indian," said Vicente Espinel in 1618--may be easily explained and even justified. Making public the death of someone arouses everyone's curiosity as to the inheritance left by the dead person, and excites his relatives--legitimate or spurious--to mistrust and resentment, if not to a battle to the death, a manner of speaking appropriate to a discussion of a dead person and of a . . .

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