The Future of Nationalization

The Future of Nationalization

The Future of Nationalization

The Future of Nationalization

Excerpt

Since this essay was sent to the press the Conservative Government has presented two drafts of its Transport Bill to the House of Commons. These have, to some extent, revised the proposals of its White Paper on Transport Policy of May, 1952, which is discussed on p. 199. We have thought it inadvisable to change the text, both because the Bill may be amended further, and because the alterations made so far have not caused us to revise our opinions. If the Bill becomes law there will be an opportunity to recast railway organization. The decision to disband the Railway Executive could be a step in the right direction; but there is little reason to suppose that the Executive will not be succeeded by systems of regional organization closely akin to those of the four Main Line companies before nationalization. If reorganization is not taken further down to local organization within the railways, little will be done to remedy those shortcomings which had existed before nationalization and have persisted under nationalization.

There have been changes in the organization of other nationalized industries, for instance in the two Airways Corporations, and changes in the composition of the boards. The Ridley Committee has reported on fuel and power policy (Cmd. 8647 of 1952). For the reasons already mentioned we have not incorporated any reference to these events in the text.

We wish to record our gratitude to those who have read drafts of this essay and assisted us with their . . .

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