After Tippecanoe: Some Aspects of the War of 1812

After Tippecanoe: Some Aspects of the War of 1812

After Tippecanoe: Some Aspects of the War of 1812

After Tippecanoe: Some Aspects of the War of 1812

Excerpt

The treaty that ended the War of American Independence in 1783 failed to provide a foundation for a firm and lasting peace between England and her former colonies. British fur traders protested the surrender of the territory south of the Great Lakes, and the Indian allies of the British felt themselves betrayed by the failure to protect their ancestral hunting grounds. Regretting the decision made at the treaty table, and hoping still to retain the West, the British made no move to carry out their agreement to relinquish, with all convenient speed, the posts at Michilimackinac, Detroit, Niagara, and elsewhere. The excuse given was the alleged failure of the United States to fulfill the terms of the treaty concerning the property rights of the Loyalists, and of the British merchants.

The forces of disintegration in the United States, which the British hoped would cause its collapse, were soon checked by the new federal constitution. American irritation grew as the British continued to retain the western posts and to occupy American soil. The British were also blamed for inciting the Indians to make war against the Americans, and for providing them with arms. Although the British really desired peace, they did not wish to incur the hostility of the Indians by abandoning them completely. But in 1794 the dream of an Indian buffer state in the Ohio region was ended by the victory of General Anthony Wayne over the Indians at Fallen Timbers, on the lower Maumee River; and in the following year, at Greenville, the Indians were forced to cede to Congress most of their remaining lands in Ohio. These events, and the mission of John Jay to London, induced Great Britain to agree to evacuate the western posts in 1796.

The British did not consent, however, to give up the right of search of American ships, which had already caused ill-feeling between the two countries during the course of England's war with France. In the years that followed, the British frequently aroused American anger both by searching American ships and by impressing sailors, some of whom claimed American citizenship. In 1807 war was barely averted . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.