Doctors in Gray: The Confederate Medical Service

Doctors in Gray: The Confederate Medical Service

Doctors in Gray: The Confederate Medical Service

Doctors in Gray: The Confederate Medical Service

Synopsis

H.H. Cunningham's Doctors in Gray, first published more than thirty years ago, remains the definitive work on the medical history of the Confederate army. Drawing on a prodigious array of sources, Cunningham paints as complete a picture as possible of the daunting task facing those charged with caring for the war's wounded and sick.

Excerpt

For almost ten years now I have enjoyed the association of a generally earnest group of medical officers, hospital stewards, matrons, nurses, ward masters, and other persons connected in some way with the work of the Confederate Medical Department during the Civil War. It is my feeling that these individuals, some of whom were surprisingly competent and determined, have too long been slighted. This unhappy circumstance would appear to be a result, in part at least, of the longstanding emphasis on military and political aspects of the conflict.

Consequently, this work represents an attempt to present the story of the Confederate medical service in such a way that the contributions, praiseworthy and otherwise, of its members to the military effort and subsequent medical development may be clearly seen and understood. I have read and reflected on all I could locate of the records these individuals kept, what they wrote, and what others wrote about them both during and after the war. Many of the medical records in Richmond were destroyed by fire near the end of the struggle, but my bibliography attests the fact that numerous source materials are yet available. It is sincerely hoped that some light has been cast upon an important and hitherto neglected aspect of our Civil War.

My indebtedness to the many who have helped make this work possible is beyond calculation. The influence, counsel, and constant encouragement of Professor Fletcher M. Green, who suggested and supervised the study during the time I was one of his many graduate students at the University of North Carolina, is deeply appreciated. I am also grateful to certain other members of the History Department there. The late Professor Albert Ray Newsome was a source of inspiration throughout my graduate training, and his many splendid qualities will not be forgotten. Professors J. Carlyle Sitterson and Hugh T. Lefler read the manuscript at an early stage, and my work as a part-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.