Kantian Aesthetics Pursued

Kantian Aesthetics Pursued

Kantian Aesthetics Pursued

Kantian Aesthetics Pursued

Synopsis

Concerned with topics at the heart of Kant's aesthetics, this provoking reading of The Critique of Judgement focuses on often misunderstood or neglected themes. Starting from the issues of the truth and justifiability of our critical assertions, Anthony Savile develops Kantian theory broadly across the arts, and shows it working with subtlety and rigour in cases as diverse as music and architecture. New light is thrown on the exemplary necessity of our aesthetic pleasures, on the Antimony of Taste, on the distinction between free and dependent beauty, on the supposed idealism of taste, and on the a priori limits of fine art. Eminently subjective material is here given a place in Kant's overall idealism in a sophisticated discussion that will invite the close attention of Kant scholars and aestheticians alike.

Excerpt

Three considerations have led to the title of this book. the past fifteen years have seen more concentration on Kant's aesthetic theory than any other part of the century, and, quite independently of the structural role that Kant's theory plays in the Critical edifice, it has gradually come to light how worthy a companion the Critique of Judgment is to his other major writings. in publishingEva Schaper Studies in Kant's Aesthetics in 1979, the Edinburgh University Press has already contributed once to this flowering of interest. It pursues its concern with the present volume.

Then, three chapters of an earlier book, Aesthetic Reconstructions, were devoted to Kant's thought in this area. While I stand by the main web of what was offered there, important threads still need to be woven into that about which I had little or nothing to say. Also, I see now that some earlier choices of emphasis should be corrected, as well as a number of downright mistakes. For the most part, the present book pursues my interest in Kantian thought without covering the same ground as before in more than marginal ways. There, I was concerned to develop a fully integrated picture of the Critique's central theme, how universally committing aesthetic judgments can be supported from the extremely narrow experiential basis on which they are made; here, that issue is set aside, and others taken up in its place.

Third, many of the more interesting aspects of Kant's aesthetic thought emerge only by extrapolation from hints and suggestions which are not extensively developed in his writing. So, the . . .

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