Towards Universal Man

Towards Universal Man

Towards Universal Man

Towards Universal Man

Excerpt

One can never account for the emergence of a genius, for genius is always something in the nature of an exception to the general rule. It is at the same time the function of genius to find expression for the emotions and ideas which stir in the unconscious and subconscious mind of the community. A bond is thus established between the genius and his people, and helps to explain the admiration and wonder with which the genius is greeted when the first flush of amazement is over. Men find in his words and actions an embodiment of the feelings and aspirations which they have dimly felt but could not express. The genius also benefits by such relation. He derives his strength and energy from the inchoate feelings and vague aspirations stirring in the mind of the common man. Tagore is typical of genius in both respects. His uniqueness is beyond question and at the same time he is deeply rooted in the life of the people whom he loved and lived for.

Tagore was fortunate in both the time and the place of his birth. The advent of the West had disturbed the placid waters of Indian life and a new awakening was seeping throughout the land. Its initial impact had dazzled the Indian mind and so impressed some of the early reformers that they at times seemed to be blind imitators of the West. We may today laugh at some of their excesses but without their wholehearted and courageous acceptance of western . . .

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