Eisenhower's Six Great Decisions: Europe, 1944-1945

Eisenhower's Six Great Decisions: Europe, 1944-1945

Eisenhower's Six Great Decisions: Europe, 1944-1945

Eisenhower's Six Great Decisions: Europe, 1944-1945

Excerpt

LOOKING back on the war in Europe, six decisions stand out from the tensions of those months as the determining points where the defeat of Hitler was sealed. All were made by the Supreme Allied Commander, General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower, on whose shoulders rested the responsibility of every undertaking. The daily routine of our high headquarters was a succession of plan and decision, each vital since it brought us closer to victory. But in these six can be traced the logic of our progress from the ports of England to the final surrender at Reims.

All but the first were based on strictly military considerations, bold decisions which displayed General Eisenhower's unusually keen sense of strategy and timing. The first, on which all others depended, was forced on the Supreme Commander not by the action of the enemy but by the weather.

This was the irrevocable order, issued shortly after 0400 hours on June 5, 1944, to launch the invasion of . . .

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