An Introduction to Metaphysics of Knowledge

An Introduction to Metaphysics of Knowledge

An Introduction to Metaphysics of Knowledge

An Introduction to Metaphysics of Knowledge

Synopsis

The present volume is the product of several years of collaboration at a distance between two people who both knew Yres R. Simon personally and admired his work. The question raised by Simon more than half a century ago, when this book was first published, are still with us: What is the nature of knowledge? What kind of activity is it to know? What is involved in the development of human knowledge? If one had to describe Simon's accomplishment by reducing it to a single point, what he succeeded in showing was that an ontology of knowledge based on common experience disproves all idealism and leads to realism by strictest necessity.

Excerpt

The present volume is the product of several years of collaboration at a distance between two people who both knew Yves R. Simon personally and admired his work. Vukan Kuic, of the University of South Carolina, was Simon's student at the University of Chicago from 1954 to 1956, and has edited three of Simon's posthumous volumes. Richard J. Thompson, of the University of Notre Dame, first read this book in a graduate course at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies at Toronto, and came to know Simon as a neighbor and a friend when he moved to South Bend in 1948.

Thompson began to translate this book in 1981, on the suggestion from another friend of Simon's, Frederick J. Crosson, then Dean of the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame, and with further encouragement from Anthony O. Simon, director of the Yves R. Simon Institute, completed the first draft in the summer of 1982. While Thompson was in London with the Notre Dame Arts and Letters program, Kuic read the manuscript and suggested a number of stylistic changes. the question was the choice between a more literal and a more idiomatic rendering of the text, which arises with any translation but presents special difficulties in the case of a technical philosophical treatise such as this one. Kuic and Thompson met for a few days at the Jacques Maritain Center at Notre Dame (where most of the Simon papers are kept), and produced a second, joint draft of the text in late 1983. After some additional work by Thompson, the manuscript was put on disks and forwarded to Kuic for final editing in 1984. For a number of extraneous reasons, this took more than two years, and it was then decided that while the anonymous reader at Fordham University Press reviewed the manuscript, Thompson should also have another go at it. Consequently, the present text incorporates most of Thompson's final recommendations as well as the corrections and changes suggested by the outside reader.

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