International Business: An Operational Theory

International Business: An Operational Theory

International Business: An Operational Theory

International Business: An Operational Theory

Excerpt

The major portion of this book grew out of our studies in comparative management. We initially were interested in the problems of why various business and industrial firms in different environments often were significantly more or less efficient than analogous organizations in other nations. In our book Comparative Management and Economic Progress (Irwin, 1965), we attempted to deal with this question.

We have worked, studied, done firsthand research, and traveled extensively in countries as diverse as England, Canada, the United States, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Egypt, Kuwait, the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, Italy, Mexico, India, Syria, and Poland. Much of the material gathered in our travels has been used in our work in comparative management.

However, it also appeared that a new dimension of business management and economic activity was occurring in many countries and cultures. Business enterprises, both publicly and privately owned, have been rapidly jumping national boundaries in recent years -- often with almost total disregard for the niceties of traditional economic and political constraint. In comparative management, one considers local firms compared to other local firms in other countries, but in most cases outside of the Communist countries, another dimension must be added. This is the international or multinational firm, which operates in countries other than its own. Import and export trade has been known since . . .

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