The Persian Corridor and Aid to Russia

The Persian Corridor and Aid to Russia

The Persian Corridor and Aid to Russia

The Persian Corridor and Aid to Russia

Excerpt

No book which takes years to write and another year to bring to publication can hope to keep up with events in Iran. I have therefore dropped a chapter on the postwar years because I could only record in it confused and ever graver incidents without being able, at such close range, to assess their meaning.

Moreover, my purpose has been to tell the story of United States Army activity in the Persian Corridor during the war years 1941-1945. Since the true historical significance of that activity may well prove to be not the success of the aid-to-Russia supply effort--significant as that was to the victory--but the intimate association of the United States with the state of Iran, I have set the Army's story within the larger framework of economic, social, and political factors, without, I hope, taking my eye from the object, which was to show how the Army got there, what it did, and what its activity meant.

I have drawn for primary sources upon official documents and upon interviews and correspondence, and for secondary sources upon narratives prepared during the war at U.S. Army headquarters, Tehran. The location of documents cited in the footnotes may in some instances be ascertained by reference to the Glossary, where designations of collections are explained. The chief of these include the files of headquarters and subheadquarters of the American commands at Tehran and Cairo; and at Washington the files of the War Department General Staff, War Plans and Operations Divisions, the Historical Records Section, Departmental Records Branch, Adjutant General's Office, the Control and International Divisions, Army Service Forces, the Military Intelligence Division, the files of the North Atlantic Division Engineer and of the New York Ordnance Department (both at New York); and at Washington again, the files of the Office of the Chief of Engineers, the Office of the Chief of Transportation, the Department of State, and the Foreign Economic Administration. Smaller selected files assembled by the historical sections at Tehran and Cairo (cited as the Persian Gulf Files and the Middle East Files respectively) have also been heavily drawn upon. I am obliged to the officials of the Historical Section, Cabinet Office, London, for their courtesy in furnishing copies of British documents not available in American files; and to the following civilian contractors who allowed access to the records of their Persian Corridor operations and, through conference and correspondence, supplied valuable information or commentary: Foley Brothers, Inc.; Spencer, White and Prentis, Inc.

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