Report from Tokyo, a Message to the American People

Report from Tokyo, a Message to the American People

Report from Tokyo, a Message to the American People

Report from Tokyo, a Message to the American People

Excerpt

The purpose of this book is to overcome a fallacy in the thinking of a large proportion of my fellow countrymen about our war with Japan. That thinking, so far as I have been able to gauge it since my return from Tokyo on August 25, 1942, is clearly influenced by preconceived but unfounded assumptions as to Japan's comparative weakness and vulnerability in war. Such thinking is not only erroneous; it constitutes a grave danger to our fighting spirit, our war effort, and our united will to win. If persisted in, it will be a serious obstacle to our ultimate victory.

During my mission to Japan I kept our Government informed, especially throughout the year 1941, of the ever-present danger of an all-out, do-or-die attempt by the Japanese military machine to render their country, through vast territorial expansion, secure against economic pressures from abroad. I reported that Japan might strike "with dangerous and dramatic suddenness." This is precisely what happened at Pearl Harbor. The decision of our Government before then to construct a two-ocean Navy and to build up and strengthen our Army and Air Force were the outstanding measures, among many others, which prove beyond any shadow of doubt that the Administration was alive to that danger.

A primary axiom in war is to know your enemy. The American people, as a whole, are dangerously ill-informed regarding the strength of one of our enemies -- Japan. I have lived in Japan for the past ten years; I know . . .

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