Atoms of Thought

Atoms of Thought

Atoms of Thought

Atoms of Thought

Excerpt

One often wonders with what the human species occupied its mind during the million years previous to the advent of the printed page. Today, the book and the magazine seem as necessary to life as food. To be able to enjoy the thoughts of the great and near great of present and past by means of the printed page is a priceless boon--the major contributing factor to popular education.

Probably foremost of my incessant and omnivorous reading have been the writings of George Santayana, my choice doubtless as much for their lucidity and beauty as their philosophical content. "His work is many colored, like a drop of water in the sun, and shifts without due notice from one aspect or interest to another."

After living with, or upon, Santayana's ideas for many years, I became impressed with one feature regarding them-- they are too little known.

The wisdom, the sound philosophy, the exquisite language, the brilliant aphorisms, the charm and subtle humor of George Santayana should not be buried in a mausoleum of philosophical literature--magnificent and imposing as this repository might be. Thus disposed of, they will be available to the few --very few--primarily to those technically interested in philosophy. Such an end to this work of art and education would be a calamity of the first order. These gems should be available to the common man who normally sees all too little of the finer productions of the race.

Bertrand Russell has said that Santayana, like Spinoza, is to be read not so much on account of his theoretical doctrines as on account of his views as to what constitutes the good life . . .

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